Photo/Video Assignment: Full Commission Meeting (CPC) [IN-PERSON ONLY]

Cleveland Community Police Commission (CPC)
Criminal Justice

Wednesday, March 27, 2024
6:00 p.m. — 8:30 p.m. EDT

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4125 Fulton Road Cleveland, OH 44114 (Directions)

Estabrook Recreation Center, 4th Floor

For this assignment, we are asking you to document this Cleveland Community Police Commission (CPC) meeting with horizontal photos and video. We may use your photos and video in our summaries of Documenters’ work, or elsewhere on the Signal Cleveland site.

What you will capture in photos and video:

  • Scenes of the room.
  • City representatives and others presenting and answering questions.
  • The audience watching the hearings.
  • Anything of note that happens when you are in the room (e.g. protests).

What you’ll submit:

  • 15-20 landscape/horizontal photos.
  • 3 vertical videos 1-5 minutes in length.
  • Captions of your photos with the names of people in each photo (to the best of your ability).

Hours and pay:

  • This is a** 2 hour assignment** that starts when the meeting begins.
  • You do not need to stay longer than 2 hours. But, you are welcome to.
  • Pay for this assignment is fixed at 6 hours total (2 meeting hours + 2 hours for prep and review + 2 hours for attending in-person).
  • Total pay for this assignment is fixed at $108.

For this assignment:

  • You will need to attend this meeting in-person at the Estabrook Recreation Center (4125 Fulton Rd.).(https://maps.app.goo.gl/26ni99Rqunpau9bJ6)
  • You may need to present a photo ID to enter the building.
  • You will need a mobile phone with the ability to take high resolution photos and video, OR
  • A camera with the ability to take high resolution photos and video.

How to submit: You will submit your photos, video and names document in the “Documents” section of your assignment page (linked in the “you next assignment” email):

  • Click the button that says “Add document.”
  • For photos, click the “Image” link in the drop down menu, and select “Choose a file” to upload an image. Do this for every image you are submitting. Enter a caption for each image that includes the names of the people in the image.
  • For video, click “File” link in the drop down menu, and select “Choose a file” to upload a video. Do this for every video you are submitting.
  • Don’t forget to complete your assignment checklist!

Some photo/video resources:

Some tips for taking photos and videos in a public meeting:

  • Under the Ohio Open Meetings Act, you are absolutely allowed to document local government meetings with photos and video.
  • In general, try to get as close to the table as you can to get shots of individuals, as well as the whole group.
  • You may have an easier time shooting from the ends of the table.
  • However, you may be told that you cannot record from certain positions in the room.
  • If you’d like, we can provide you with a Documenters badge to identify yourself as a Cleveland Documenter.
  • If asked about your presence at the meeting, feel free to use this language: I am a Greater Clevelander trained to document public meetings in the public interest. My work as a Cleveland Documenter is published in partnership with Signal Cleveland.

The Cleveland Community Police Commission (CPC) was established in 2015 as part of the terms of the Consent Decree between the City of Cleveland and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). Following an investigation, the DOJ determined there was a pattern of excessive force used by the Cleveland Division of Police (CDP). The Consent Decree outlined the work that needed to be done so CDP policies, practices and procedures comply with Constitutional law.

Cleveland voters approved amendments to the city’s charter in 2021 that gave the CPC final say over police discipline. Learn more about the CPC with this explainer from Anastazia Vanisko.

Commission members

  • John Adams, co-chair
  • Sharena Zayed, co-chair
  • Shandra Benito
  • James Chura
  • Audrianna Rodriguez
  • Teri Wang
  • Charles Donaldson
  • Kyle Earley
  • Alana Garrett-Ferguson
  • Cait Kennedy
  • Gregory Reaves
  • Jan Ridgeway
  • Piet van Lier

More background on the CPC:

The CPC was mandated under the Consent Decree to provide community input on needed policing reforms from the many diverse communities in Cleveland:

  • Faith-based organizations
  • Civil rights advocates
  • Business/philanthropic community
  • Communities of color
  • Advocacy organizations
  • Academia
  • Youth and student organizations
  • Homeless
  • Those with mental illness

CPC Commissioners consist of individuals that represent the diversity of Cleveland and a representative from each of the following police associations: The Black Shield, Fraternal Order of Police (FOP), and The Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Association (CPPA).

The CPC works to empower the community’s voice in the reform process. It works with the community to develop reports and recommendations on ways police policies can better reflect community values. Better policies will help ensure policing in Cleveland is safe, effective, and that people’s civil rights are upheld.

Find past Documenters coverage of CPC meetings here: https://cleveland.documenters.org/reporting/?agency=246

Public meetings will begin with a public comment period.

NOTE: This meeting can run 2.5 hours.

Check the source website for additional information

Agency Information

Cleveland Community Police Commission (CPC)

See meeting notes for details

clecpc.org

(216) 505-5920

info@clecpc.org

Facebook page

See Documenters reporting

Watch the livestream on the CPC’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/@ClevelandCPC/streams

The Cleveland Community Police Commission (CPC) was established in 2015 as part of the terms of the Consent Decree between the City of Cleveland and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). Following an investigation, the DOJ determined there was a pattern of excessive force used by the Cleveland Division of Police (CDP). The Consent Decree outlined the work that needed to be done so CDP policies, practices and procedures comply with Constitutional law.

Cleveland voters approved amendments to the city’s charter in 2021 that gave the CPC final say over police discipline.

The CPC was mandated under the Consent Decree to provide community input on needed policing reforms from the many diverse communities in Cleveland:

Faith-based organizations

Civil rights advocates

Business/philanthropic community

Communities of color

Advocacy organizations

Academia

Youth and student organizations

Homeless

Those with mental illness

CPC Commissioners consist of individuals that represent the diversity of Cleveland and a representative from each of the following police associations: The Black Shield, Fraternal Order of Police (FOP), and The Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Association (CPPA).

The CPC works to empower the community’s voice in the reform process. It works with the community to develop reports and recommendations on ways police policies can better reflect community values. Better policies will help ensure policing in Cleveland is safe, effective, and that people’s civil rights are upheld.

Documents

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